The Catholic University of America

CONTINUING EDUCATION at NCSSS

For questions or additional information on Professional Development and Training, contact the office at 202-319-4388.

Interested in conducting a workshop? 

Link here, complete the workshop proposal, and email it to: Thursby@cua.edu or Shaffera@cua.edu.

Spring 2016 Professional Development Workshops at NCSSS

 

 

 

Playing Through Anxiety: Using Improvisation Techniques to Move Moods

Friday February 5th 9am-noon

The Catholic University of America

Caldwell Auditorium

Lisa Kays
Lisa Kays MSW, LICSW, LCSW-C holds an MSW from Catholic University and has been practicing psychotherapy with individuals, couples and groups since 2013. She has studied and performed as an improvisor for more than five years and has been on the faculty of Washington Improv Theater since 2008.  She has completed the first year of the Washington School of Psychiatry's Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy Program. Lisa is a clinician in private practice in DC, and has trained and worked with a diverse spectrum of clients in a variety of clinical settings.

Registration: $60 ($40 NCSSS field instructor, $25 current NCSSS student)

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Workshop participants will engage in playful, fun, improvisational games and activities that heighten self-discovery and provide enhanced understanding of the underlying processes, thoughts and beliefs related to client social and performance anxiety and strategies to overcome it.

The workshop will provide experiences designed to illustrate and illicit various aspects of self-discovery; anxiety-related thoughts and beliefs that inhibit spontaneity, performance, authenticity, and creativity; how collaboration, relationship and partnership (and isolation) influence anxiety and performance; ways that posture and physical movement influence and can be used to shift moods and attitudes; and, ways to use the practice of play to decrease anxiety and increase presence in the moment.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  •    Learn improvisational acting techniques can help identify and shift feeling states

  • Gain increased self-knowledge that can positively influence client work and empathy

  •   Explore and understand barriers we (and our clients) experience to intimacy, authenticity and spontaneity

  •  Identify specific thoughts and beliefs linked to social and performance anxiety

 Three (3) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Self-reflection to Improve Practice: Challenging Our Own Subtle Stigmas in Mental Health Care

Friday February 12th  9am-noon

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Jen Charles

Jennifer L.K. Charles, MSW, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the National Catholic School of Social Service at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.  Charles’ clinical social work background is in community mental health, including crisis stabilization and mobile crisis response.  Guided by her practice and educational experiences, Charles’ research concentrates on the identification of and issues related to the stigma of mental illness.  Particularly of interest are the negative attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of mental health service providers toward their clients, as well as the influence of stigma on the mental health help-seeking behaviors of college-aged adults.  Charles earned her Ph.D. from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia; her M.S.W from Barry University in Miami Shores, Florida; and her B.A. from Virginia Tech. 

 

Registration: $60 ($40 NCSSS field instructor, $25 current NCSSS student)

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Often subtle and unintentionally conveyed, negative attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors of mental health providers can be perceived by clients and families as a particularly harmful source of stigmatization.  This stigma is a significant threat to the establishment and growth of a strong therapeutic relationship, often a vital component of a client’s recovery journey.  This workshop is intended to generate awareness, discussion, and sensitivity to the client and family experience of stigmatization in the mental healthcare setting. 

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  •  Identify and define aspects of mental health care and provider interaction that clients of services perceive as particularly stigmatizing. 
  • Make use of an empirically supported self-assessment instrument in an effort to promote self-reflective practice, sensitive to the perceptions of stigmatization voiced by clients and families engaged in mental health services.
  • Indicate methods by which they may address the presence of provider-based stigmatization in their own practice, with supervisors/supervisees, and within their agency, if applicable. 

 Three (3) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Biomedical Ethics

Monday February 22nd  9am –4pm

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Paul Scherz

Dr. Paul Scherz began his academic career in biomedical science, studying the genetics of embryonic development. Over the course of receiving a B.A. in Molecular and Cell Biology from the University of California, Berkeley, a Ph.D. in Genetics from Harvard University, and completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco, he became increasingly interested in the theological and ethical implications of his own work in biomedical science and the ethics of medicine in general. These interests inspired him to complete an M.T.S. and a Ph.D. at the University of Notre Dame. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Moral Theology and Ethics at the Catholic University of America where he teaches on biomedical ethics and moral theology more broadly.

Registration: $120 ($100 NCSSS field instructor, $40 current NCSSS student)

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This workshop will provide an overview of the principles and methods used for making decisions in medical ethics. The presenter will draw on case studies from decisions made surrounding end-of-life care for group discussion and analysis. Topics will include the general bioethics principles of autonomy, beneficence, and justice; how these principles are applied in practice; how these principles are understood differently in certain medical settings using the example of Catholic health care systems; difficulties in the use of these principles; standards of surrogate decision-making; and controversial issues in end-of-life care.

Participants will gain a better understanding of ethical thought surrounding health care decisions as well as the specific problems of end-of-life care.

Participants will be able to:

  • Describe informed consent processes and their justification at the end of life
  •  Know when to employ a surrogate decision maker and what standards a surrogate decision maker can use
  • Discuss different ethical principles for deciding on treatment decisions at the end of life
  • Discuss arguments surrounding controversial issues around end of life care, such as euthanasia, assisted suicide, artificial nutrition and hydration, brain death, responses to the shortage of organ donations
  • Identify how secular bioethics principles are used in particular religious traditions

 Six (6) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Using Techniques from Motivational Interviewing to Engage Adolescent Clients

Friday March 4th 9am-noon

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Randall  O’Toole, MSW, LICSW

Randall has recently joined the National Catholic School of Social Service as a Clinical Assistant Professor.  Randall is a licensed clinical social worker in the states of Virginia, Maryland, and DC with over 19 years of experience working with children, adolescents, adults, and families in a clinical setting.  Randall is a graduate of the Catholic University of America’s National Catholic School of Social Service.  He has also completed advanced certificate training programs at the Washington School of Psychiatry in Clinical Social Work with Children and Adolescents as well as Clinical Supervision.  He has recently been invited to join the Washington School of Psychiatry’s Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Program as a Guest Faculty member.

Registration: $60 ($40 NCSSS field instructor, $25 current NCSSS student)

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Although not developed specifically for the adolescent population, ideas and techniques from motivational interviewing can be quite useful in clinically engaging and treating this client group.  A central feature of adolescent development can be the “oppositionality” associated with the separation/individuation and identity development processes.  Motivational interviewing provides a unique and helpful perspective in reframing and working with this treatment dynamic.  This training will not only focus on developing an understanding of adolescents through a motivational interviewing lens, but will also provide participants with concrete tools and interventions connected to this framework.  This training will address how social workers can combine motivational interviewing with other clinical approaches.  New thinking about how to incorporate motivational interviewing ideas in working with adolescent client family systems will also be presented.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to identify:

  •     Identify and describe basic principles of motivational interviewing as an effective framework for treatment.
  • Identify and describe adolescent development processes and how they may contribute to what clinicians see as “oppositionality.”
  • Understand why and how motivational interviewing can be a good fit with the adolescent population.
  • Develop a comfort level in implementing basic motivational interviewing techniques and understand how the techniques relate to the different stages of client change as outlined in the model.
  • Understand how motivational interviewing can be combined with other treatment approaches effectively.
  • Implement motivational interviewing ideas and techniques in family systems work with adolescents.

 Three (3) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

The Bipolar Child: Assessment, Treatment and Research Update

Friday March 18th noon – 3pm

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Lisa Cullins

Lisa Cullins, M.D. is the Director, Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic at Children's National Medical Center, as well as the Director of the Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship Training Program at Children's National Medical Center.    Prior to this, Dr. Cullins was the Director of Psychiatric Services at the Jewish Social Services Agency. Dr. Cullins received her medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine in 1998. She completed her general psychiatry residency at UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute and her child and adolescent psychiatry residency at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in 2003.  Dr. Cullins was also appointed the associate traninig director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency program at Children's National Medical Center (CNMC).  She receive the Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award at Children's in 2006.  From 2007 to 2009, Dr. Cullins servied as the medical director for EMQ Children and Family Services in Campbell, California, and the Family Mosaic Project of the San Francisco Department of Public Health.  Prior to her current position, Dr. Cullins was the program director, Georgetown University Hospital/Adventist Behavioral Health Child & Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Training Program.  She received the Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award at Georgetown in 2012.  

 

Registration: $60 ($40 NCSSS field instructor, $25 current NCSSS student)

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Although rare, bipolar disorder does exist in children and adolescents.  Careful assessment is paramount but can be very challenging.  Wonderful research has been done that has provided us with critical information regarding characteristics of bipolar disorder in youth, brain structure and chemistry and efficacy in treatment but much more work is needed.  The most important element in our work with children and adolescents with bipolar disorder and their families is ongoing support, education and collaboration other natural supports.  Children and adolescents with bipolar disorder can do well if there is early detection and appropriate implementation of combination treatment.

This workshop will educate the participants in the assessment, diagnosis, treatment and current research in bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. Will review signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder, DSM criteria, assessment, treatment and research update.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize and understand the signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents.
  • Understand current recommended treatment modalities for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder.

 Three (3) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Relationship Enhancement Therapy for Couples

Monday March 21st  9am-4pm

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Robert Scuka

Rob Scuka, Ph.D., M.S.W., LCSW-C, is Executive Director of National Institute for Relationship Enhancement (NIRE) and a member of NIRE’s Faculty. Dr. Scuka is certified as a Relationship Enhancement® Marital/Couples Therapist, Supervisor and Trainer, a Couple Relationship Enhancement® Educator/Leader, Supervisor and Trainer, a Child-Centered Play Therapist, Supervisor and Trainer, and a Filial Family Therapist and Supervisor. He is author of Relationship Enhancement Therapy: Healing Through Deep Empathy and Intimate Dialogue (Routledge, 2005). In addition, Dr. Scuka is co-author (with Drs. Bernard Guerney and William Nordling) of the Couples’ Relationship Enhancement® Program: Leader’s Manual and is the principal author of the Home Study Program Guides that accompany NIRE’s two video-based home study programs for professionals. Dr. Scuka has served as the principal leader of NIRE.s Couples’ Relationship Enhancement® Weekend and has led numerous three-day RE Therapy and 3-day RE Program Leadership training workshops across the country. Dr. Scuka also leads church retreats for couples and appears as a guest speaker at community events for the general public. In addition to his Master in Social Work from the University of Maryland at Baltimore, Dr. Scuka also has a doctorate in religious studies and taught philosophy and religion at American University and Georgetown University for nine years. He also has been on the faculty of the University of Maryland’s School of Social Work in Baltimore, MD as an adjunct instructor.

Registration: $120 ($100 NCSSS field instructor, $40 current NCSSS student)

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RE Therapy combines a psychoeducational skills-training approach with deep emotional processing designed to transform couples and families’ negative patterns of interaction into positive, nurturing ones so as to facilitate deepened emotional connection and healing in ruptured relationships. The core RE skills focus on how to manage conflict effectively and how to dialogue in order to uncover clients’ most vital feelings, concerns and desires. This in turn empowers even the most distressed couples/families to resolve current and future problems on their own. An additional strength of RE Therapy is that it equalizes power within relationships, both between genders and across generations. RE Therapy is supported by 40 years of research that validates its clinical effectiveness. This workshop will introduce the theory and practice of RE therapy and demonstrate how the RE therapy process is used in clinical practice via videotaped therapy sessions, live demonstration and experiential practice. 

 Six (6) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Beyond Cutting: An In-depth look at Self-Injury

Friday April 1st  9am-4pm

Pryzbyla 351

The Catholic University of America

Veronica Cruz

Veronica Cruz is a bilingual (Spanish and English speaking) clinical and forensic social worker who has worked with children, adolescents and families for the last seventeen years. Ms. Cruz was employed for ten years, at the Office of the Public Defender in Rockville as a forensic social worker. In 2015 she became the owner of Cruz and Associates a consulting firm specializing in forensic social work in particular sentencing mitigation for juvenile and adult offenders.  She has been deemed in expert in circuit, district and juvenile court. From 2000-2014 she worked as an emergency room and psychiatric social worker. She has extensive experience in inpatient psych and partial hospitalization psych programs. In 2007 she started her professional continuing education career and has presented over hundred workshops locally and nationally. Ms. Cruz specializes in criminal defense mitigation, dual diagnosis, crisis intervention, addiction, trauma and working with diverse ethnic groups.
Ms. Cruz is a graduate of the Catholic University of America with a B.A. in psychology (graduated in 2003), and received her Masters of Social Work, specializing in mental health and addiction from the University Of Maryland School Of School Work (graduated in 2006). In 2014 she completed an advanced two year post graduate Forensic Social Work Certification through the University of Maryland Continuing Education Department. In 2008 she co-created the Forensic Social Work Committee for NASW and in 2010 became the sole chair, a position she still maintains. Under her leadership the committee has successful hosted two national forensic social work conferences. She is a member of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the National Association of Forensic Social Workers (NOFSW), the National Legal Aid & Defender Association (NLADA), School Social Work Association of America (SSWAA) and is a member of the American Case Management Association (ACMA).

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Registration: $120 ($100 NCSSS field instructor, $40 current NCSSS student)

This workshop will examine the various forms of self-injuries behavior that go beyond cutting. It is estimated that two million people in the United States injure themselves in some way. Self-injury, which is also known as self-harm, or self-mutilation refers to individuals who intentionally and repeatedly harm themselves. The methods most often implored are cutting, but can also include such things as: hair pulling (trichotillomania), banging and interfering with wound healing (dermatillomania). Various issues will be discussed including but not limited to propensity, forms of injury, risk factors, brain development, co-morbidity, nonsuicidal self-injury diagnosis and treatment modalities. This is an interactive workshop with case scenarios presented and discussed.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

1.      Define what self injury behavior is, beyond the traditional cutting methods.  

2.      Explore propensity, risk factors and brain development and how to integrate these variables into the treatment plan. 

3.      Increase participant’s knowledge of various treatment modalities, including psychopharmacology and talk therapy.  

4.      Understand the connection between self-injury and co-morbidity. Analyzing the new diagnosis of “nonsuicidal self-injury” 

 Six (6) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Trauma Whisperers II: Advanced Methods & Techniques

Friday April 22nd  9am-4pm

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Dan Buccino

Dan Buccino, LCSW-C, BCD, is an assistant professor, clinical supervisor, and student coordinator at John Hopkins Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.  He is also the co-founder and co-director of the Baltimore Psychotherapy Institute.  His professional interests include psychotherapy outcome and effectiveness; psychotherapy education; marital, couples, and family therapy; civility (and health care); psychoanalysis; and cognitive impairment.

 

Registration: $120 ($100 NCSSS field instructor, $40 current NCSSS student)

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Over the last six years, Trauma Whisperers workshops have become popular nationally.  In response to repeated inquiries, this new, clinically relevant workshop is meant to build on the general strategies offered in day-one Trauma Whisperers workshops and offer participants more advanced theoretical, technical, and philosophical  approaches for working with patients with complex trauma issues.  Theoretical approaches considered will include object relations, Lacanian, narrative, and feedback-informed treatments, among others.  Through careful video review of the presenter's and other's work in treatment, participants will be encouraged to share their own clinical cases and dilemmas in trauma treatment in order to create the most clinically meaningful learning experience.  In offering strategies to help clinicians sustain their work with often difficult and confounding patients, we will also consider contemporary approaches to ensure treatment accountability.

Upon completion of this course, participants will learn:

  •   Several novel theoretical approaches and techniques for working with trauma
  •  Different ways to approach transference, countertransference, resistance, and impasse issues
  • How to fully and carefully evaluate and formulate patients with trauma histories in order to uniquely design treatment
  •  How to most effectively utilize consultation and supervision
  • Methods for generating practice-based evidence and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

 Six (6) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Bibliotherapy

Friday April 29th  9am-noon

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Patrice Forrester

Patrice Forrester is a graduate of Catholic University and a licensed independent clinical social worker. Patrice has worked with children, teenagers, adults, and families in community mental health facilities as a therapist, diagnostic assessment writer, and crisis counselor. She also served as a youth director for 3 years at her church ministering to adolescents and their families. Patrice utilizes trauma, creative arts, family, and cognitive-behavioral therapies in her clinical work with individuals.  

 

Registration: $60 ($40 NCSSS field instructor, $25 current NCSSS student)

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Participants will learn about theories that underlie bibliotherapy practice and the history of the use of bibliotheraphy with individuals. Participants will also learn and experience various bibliotherapy techniques that can be used in clinical work with children and adolescents.

This training will provide clinicians with creative clinical interventions for children and adolescents that facilitate expression of feelings and behavioral change.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

  •    Describe bibliotherapy and examples of its use in history
  • Explain the rationale for the use of bibliotherapy in clinical practice
  • Identify presenting problems in clinical practice with children and adolescents for which bibliotherapy can be utilized
  • Describe and demonstrate bibliotherapy techniques in clinical practice with children and adolescents.

 Three (3) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

 

 

 

Innovations in Clinical Assessment and Treatment of Suicidal Risk

Friday April 29th 9am to 4pm

The Catholic University of America

Caldwell Hall Auditorium

David Jobes

Registration: $120 ($100 NCSSS field instructor, $40 current NCSSS student)

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David A. Jobes, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Professor of Psychology and Associate Director of Clinical Training at The Catholic University of America; he is also an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.  His research and writing on suicide has produced numerous peer reviewed publications (including five books on clinical suicidology). As an internationally recognized suicidologist, Dr. Jobes is a past President of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) and was a recipient of that organization’s 1995 “Shneidman Award” in recognition of early career contribution to suicide research.  Dr. Jobes also received the 2012 AAS “Dublin Award” in recognition of career contribution in suicidology.  He has served as a research consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has been a consultant to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, the FBI, the Department of Defense, and Veterans Affairs.   Dr. Jobes is member of the Scientific Council of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) and he is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.  Board certified in clinical psychology (American Board of Professional Psychology), Dr. Jobes also maintains a private clinical and forensic practice at the Washington Psychological Center.

Participants will deepen their understanding of suicide and the suicidal mind, expand their capacity to perform suicidal assessments, and explore treatment techniques.  Additionally, the legal and ethical considerations of working with suicidal clients will be discussed. 

This training presents broadly on innovations in the clinical assessment and treatment of suicidal risk.  The clinical approaches offered feature evidence-based ways for effectively assessing and stratifying suicidal risk and subsequently treating that risk with treatments and interventions that actually work.  There will be a special emphasis on an evidence-based clinical intervention developed by the presenter called the “Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality” (CAMS).  Finally ethics and malpractice liability will be considered as a means of ensuring the best possible care.

Most clinicians do not know about effective assessments and treatments for suicidal risk.  This training will raise their awareness about evidence-based clinical approaches that effectively assess and treat suicidal risk in clinical settings.

Following this course participants will be able to:

  • Assess and stratify suicidal risk in to reliable sub-types
  • Use evidence-based interventions to treat suicidal risk
  • Use techniques that decrease the risk of malpractice liability related to suicide.

 Six (6) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Impact of Parental Substance Abuse

Friday May 13th 9am-4pm

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Veronica Cruz

Veronica Cruz is a bilingual (Spanish and English speaking) clinical and forensic social worker who has worked with children, adolescents and families for the last seventeen years. Ms. Cruz was employed for ten years, at the Office of the Public Defender in Rockville as a forensic social worker. In 2015 she became the owner of Cruz and Associates a consulting firm specializing in forensic social work in particular sentencing mitigation for juvenile and adult offenders.  She has been deemed in expert in circuit, district and juvenile court. From 2000-2014 she worked as an emergency room and psychiatric social worker. She has extensive experience in inpatient psych and partial hospitalization psych programs. In 2007 she started her professional continuing education career and has presented over hundred workshops locally and nationally. Ms. Cruz specializes in criminal defense mitigation, dual diagnosis, crisis intervention, addiction, trauma and working with diverse ethnic groups.
Ms. Cruz is a graduate of the Catholic University of America with a B.A. in psychology (graduated in 2003), and received her Masters of Social Work, specializing in mental health and addiction from the University Of Maryland School Of School Work (graduated in 2006). In 2014 she completed an advanced two year post graduate Forensic Social Work Certification through the University of Maryland Continuing Education Department. In 2008 she co-created the Forensic Social Work Committee for NASW and in 2010 became the sole chair, a position she still maintains. Under her leadership the committee has successful hosted two national forensic social work conferences. She is a member of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), the National Association of Forensic Social Workers (NOFSW), the National Legal Aid & Defender Association (NLADA), School Social Work Association of America (SSWAA) and is a member of the American Case Management Association (ACMA).

Registration: $120 ($100 NCSSS field instructor, $40 current NCSSS student)

REGISTER

 

Synopsis: According to the Department of Health and Human Services 15 million American adults abuse alcohol and as a consequence 40 million children live in homes where the primary caretaker is addicted to alcohol or other drugs. It is estimated that yearly 675,000 children suffer serious abuse or neglect as a result of parental abuse.

This workshop will explore the collateral consequences of parental substance and how it affects Children of alcoholics and other substance abusers (COA/COSA). Various issues will be discussed including but not limited to behavioral, medical/psychiatric, educational and emotional consequences. Current literature will be discussed and participants will be able to articulate the importance of understanding emerging family structures, dual exposure to domestic violence and addiction and treatment interventions.  The presenter is a bi-cultural forensic social worker specialized in criminal defense mitigation, dual diagnosis, crisis intervention, addictions, trauma, and working with diverse ethnic groups.  This is an interactive workshop where case vignettes will be presented and discussed. 

 Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

1.      Identify risk and consequences of parental substance use on children

2.      Understand family structure and it’s importance in assessment and treatment

3.      Identify treatment options for children exposed to violence and addiction

 

 Six (6) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Treating Moral Injury

Friday May 20th 9am-noon

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Eileen Dombo

Eileen Dombo PhD, LICSW is an Assistant Professor and Chair of the Baccalaureate social work program at the Catholic University of America’s National Catholic School of Social Service.  Additionally, she is a psychotherapist and consultant in private practice in Washington, DC.  For ten years she was a clinical social worker at the DC Rape Crisis Center providing therapy to survivors of sexual violence and others impacted by sexual abuse.  She worked with individuals, couples, families and groups and advanced to become the Clinical Director.  Dr. Dombo began her teaching with NCSSS in 2000 as an adjunct professor and as a Visiting Assistant Professor in 2006. She has over 15 years experience in trauma treatment and services to sexual abuse survivors as a direct service practitioner, supervisor, and clinical director. She has provided numerous clinical trainings to prepare clinical social workers for the individual, couples and group treatment with survivors of sexual trauma. In addition, she has worked with many organizations to address issues of vicarious trauma and burn-out in social workers.

Registration: $60 ($40 NCSSS field instructor, $25 current NCSSS student)

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Moral injury is often discussed within the context of military service and combat veterans. However, civilians report experiences of moral injury beyond the battlefield that require social workers to respond to these clients in a therapeutic manner. This workshop will discuss the differences between moral injury and PTSD, address the role of shame in moral injury, and give guidance on how to assess for moral injury and provide treatment.

After this workshop, participants will be able to:

  •  Explain the differences between moral injury and PTSD.
  • Identify the role of shame in moral injury and understand how to address this with clients.
  •  Apply this knowledge in assessment and treatment of clients with moral injury.

 Three (3) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy

Friday June 3rd 9am-4pm

The Catholic University of America

Pryzbyla 351

Jon Fredrickson

Jon Frederickson, MSW is co-chair of the ISTDP Training Program at the Washington School of Psychiatry where he has been on the faculty since 1988. He was previously chair of the Supervision Training Program and the Advanced Psychotherapy Training Program at the Washington School of Psychiatry as well as chair of their Faculty Clinical Council.  He is also chair of the Norwegian ISTDP Training Program, Co-chair of the Italian Core Training Program sponsored by the Italian EDT Society, and faculty of the ISTDP Training Program at the Laboratorium Psychoedukacji in Warsaw, Poland.  He has published over twenty five articles and book chapters as well as two books. He has presented videotaped examples of his clinical work in the Netherlands, Denmark, Norway, Poland, Italy, Great Britain, Lebanon, Dubai, India, Australia, and throughout the United States. Among the highlights of his presentations have been several at Oxford University at St. Johns College and Magdalen College, and at UCLA.   Before he became a therapist, Jon was a professional musician for a number of years. When he became a therapist he was struck by a big difference between therapy and music. Music is taught in a far more structured, organized, and systematic fashion to help musicians develop practical performing skills so they can create great art. Jon’s lifetime goal has been to learn to teach therapy as well as his music teachers taught music.

 

Registration: $120 ($100 NCSSS field instructor, $40 current NCSSS student)

REGISTRATION

 

In this presentation Jon Frederickson, MSW will share clinical expertise, review case examples, and use videotaped sessions to show how to work with depressed patients who have not responded to earlier therapies.

Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to identify:

  •   how to identify defenses that will cause depression
  • how to stop regression
  •  how to build the capacity to bear feelings without becoming depressed
  • how to address acting out in session

We will view and study an initial videotaped session with a depressed client moment by moment, learning how to assess the patient's needs and how to address them. Unlike most workshops which talk about therapy, here we will see an actual therapy session. Rather than just learn theory, we will learn how to put theory into practice through interventions that lead to genuine change. You will come away knowing how to be more effective with your clients.

 Six (6) Social Work CEUs will be provided at conclusion of this workshop for participants

 

Registration Information
Online registration is available through our website. Look for the workshop you are interested in, and link to the registration site. NCSSS students and Field Instructors receive a discounted rate.
Phone registration is available. Please call 202-319-4388
Cancellation policy 
Refunds will be honored up to 1 week prior to the workshop, minus a $25.00 processing fee.  Substitution requests for an alternate workshop will also be considered.  Please contact Ellen Thursby at Thursby@cua.edu.  Registrants will be notified if a workshop is cancelled due to low enrollment and registration fees will be fully refunded. Workshops will be cancelled if The Catholic University of America is closed due to inclement weather or other emergencies. Please check the website http://cua.edu for information on closures.
Parking
On campus parking is very limited. It is best to use public transportation. CUA is located on the Red Line of the Metro, CUA/Brookland stop.
Accommodations
If you require any special accommodations, we will try to meet those needs. Please call at least 2 weeks prior to an event to make reasonable requests.
For more information, contact
Ellen Thursby, Director, Office of Field Education and Professional Development or Allyson Shaffer, Associate Director, Office of Field Education and Professional Development. Tel: 202-319-4388, Thursby@cua.edu or, Shaffera@cua.edu.