The Catholic University of America

CONTINUING EDUCATION at NCSSS

For questions or additional information on Professional Development program, contact the office at 202-319-4388.

Interested in conducting a workshop? 

Link here, complete the workshop proposal, and email it to: Allyson Shaffer, Associate Director of Field Education & Professional Development  Shaffera@cua.edu

Upcoming Professional Development Workshops at NCSSS

FALL 2017  - Please note the schedule of workshops below for Fall 2017.  The Registration links will be posted by July 1, 2017.  

(Scroll down for full course descriptions & registration links)

 

Friday 9.15.17

9am to noon

Child Abuse, Neglect & Maltreatment: Indicators & Interventions

Michelle Cole, BSW, MSW, LCSW

 

 

Friday 9.22.17

9am to 4pm

Motivational Interviewing: Inviting & Acknowledging Change Talk

Bernard Showers, LCSW, CAADC

 

Monday 10.2.17

9am to 4pm

The Art of Deep Empathy

Rob Scuka, PhD

 

Monday 10.16.17

9am to 4pm

Singing to the Lions: A Workshop Methodology to Help Children Overcome Fear and Violence in Their Lives

 

Lucy Steinitz, MSW, PhD

 

Friday 10.20.17

9am to 4pm

Leaving Home to Come Home: Exploring how Cultural Competence & Understanding Impact Self-Awareness and Clinical Effectiveness.

Marilee Aronson, Psy.D.

 

Friday 11.3.17

9am to noon

Trauma Informed Social Work Practice

Denise Tordella, MA, LPC

 

Friday 11.10.17

9am to 4pm

Engagement Strategies for Building Partnerships with Families Affected by Intergenerational Trauma

Sarah A. Gardner, LCSW-C

 

Friday 12.1.17

9am to noon

From Prison to Home: The Psychological Challenges of Re-Entry

Veronica Cruz, MSW, LICSW, LCSW-C

Child Abuse, Neglect & Maltreatment: Indicators & Interventions

Friday 9.15.17

9am to noon

Pryzbyla Building Room 327

Child Abuse, Neglect & Maltreatment: Indicators & Interventions

Michelle Cole, BSW, MSW, LCSW             

3 CE credits

REGISTRATION:

Regular registration: $60

Current NCSSS Field Instructor: $45

Current NCSSS Student: $25

The purpose of this workshop is to enable healthcare professionals and mandated reporters to identify and report child maltreatment, including child abuse and child neglect.

Healthcare professionals have a responsibility to recognize and report suspected child abuse and maltreatment.  At the end of this training, participants will be able to identify the following types of maltreatment that involve acts of commission and are considered child abuse:

·         Physical abuse

·         Sexual abuse

·         Psychological abuse

Participants will also be able to:

·         Define child maltreatment, child abuse, and child neglect according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

·         Explain the risk factors contributing to child maltreatment.

·         Recognize physical and behavioral indicators of child maltreatment.

·         Differentiate situations in which mandated reporters must report suspected cases of maltreatment.

·         List procedures for placing a child into protective custody.

·         Discuss the legal protections afforded mandated reporters as well as the consequences for failing to report.

 

Michele is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the Commonwealth of Virginia. She currently is a board member for the Center for Alexandria’s Children (CAC).  While the Clinical Supervisor at an inner city non-profit in Washington, D.C., Michele supervised case managers and conducted individual and family therapy as well as social skills groups with court ordered at-risk youth. She has worked extensively with children and adolescents with Individual Education Plans (IEP). In addition, Michele was a School Guidance Counselor at a parochial school in Alexandria, VA. There, she created a program where she conducted class guidance lessons, individual therapy, small problem centered group therapy, and social skills groups with children. She is an educational advocate in the City of Alexandria. Currently, Michele is pursuing her PhD. in Social Work from The Catholic University of America.

Motivational Interviewing: Inviting & Acknowledging Change Talk

Friday 9.22.17

9am to 4pm

Pryzbyla Building Room 351

Motivational Interviewing: Inviting & Acknowledging Change Talk

Bernard Showers, LCSW, CAADC

6 CE Credits

 

REGISTRATION:

Regular registration: $120

Current NCSSS Field Instructor: $100

Current NCSSS Student: $40

 

The Motivational Interviewing: Inviting and Acknowledging Change Talk workshop targets Clinicians seeking an advanced level of Motivational Interviewing training. The learner will consider MI's application to a broad use of behavior changes ranging from health behaviors to substance use. The workshop offers a hands-on experiential learning approach with ample opportunity for role-plays, discussion, and case conceptualization. Learners will leave with an advanced knowledge of tangible clinical interventions to be utilized with Clients, targeting collaboratively identified problem behaviors. 

Participants will learn how Motivational Interviewing's emphasis on change talk makes it unique.  Participants will learn tangible skills for eliciting change talk with their clients, helping them to gain and enhance motivation towards making meaningful behavioral changes. 

·         Learn and practice Motivational Interviewing micro-skills used to acknowledge change talk.

·         Learn, practice, and discuss the use of Motivational Interviewing with diverse populations in a variety of settings and with numerous behavioral targets.

·         Learn and practice tangible skills used to invite change talk including the Importance and Confidence Rulers and Values Card-Sort exercise.

The learner will leave with an advanced understanding of the utilization micro-skills and structured activities used to elicit change talk.  Learners will learn about the research that guides Motivational Interviewing's increasing focus on recognizing, reinforcing, and evoking change language.

Mr. Showers has worked in substance use treatment since 2005. He obtained his CAADC in 2012.  He has been with the VA healthcare system since 2010, utilizing his training and skills in MI. Soon after completion of the training for clinicians, he was nominated to be a National Consultant in the VA for Motivational Interviewing and Motivational Enhancement Therapy. He has led two groups of Licensed Independent Practitioners from throughout the country to successful completion of the objective completion criteria. He is a guest lecturer and  adjunct professor Shippensburg University's MSW Program. He has co-led national trainings for Motivational Interviewing for the VA, and has participated in the development and facilitation of a local one day workshop with six months of follow up consultation for Baltimore VA LIP's and students. 

In 2016 he completed the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers “Train-the-Trainer” curriculum.


 

 

The Art of Deep Empathy

Monday 10.2.17

9am to 4pm

Pryzbyla Building Room 351

The Art of Deep Empathy

Rob Scuka, PhD

6 CE Credits

 

REGISTRATION:

Regular registration: $120

Current NCSSS Field Instructor: $100

Current NCSSS Student: $40

 

Empathy is one of the therapist’s most important – and sometimes most taken-for-granted – therapeutic tools. Yet, it often is misunderstood, both conceptually and in terms of application and technique. This workshop will clarify what empathy is (and isn’t), how to achieve a deep empathic connection, and the two distinct modes of verbally empathizing:  the conventional “You” mode and the more specialized “Identification” mode. It will also demonstrate special applications of empathy to deepen the therapeutic process with couples and families, such as becoming and troubleshooting, as well as effective strategies for teaching and demonstrating empathy to clients. Participants will have the opportunity to practice the specialized Identification Mode of empathy. This workshop is designed for both beginning and seasoned clinicians.

Objectives: Participants completing this workshop will be able to: 

·         Conceptualize empathy with clarity

·         Explain the differences between the two different modes of verbal empathy

·         Employ specialized applications of empathy such as “Becoming” and “Troubleshooting” to better manage the clinical process

·         Effectively teach empathy skills to clients.

Learning Methods: Lecture, live demonstration, video, discussion and role-play practice

 

Rob Scuka, Ph.D., M.S.W., L.C.S.W.-C., is Executive Director of the National Institute of Relationship Enhancement® in Bethesda, MD and author of Relationship Enhancement Therapy: Healing Through Deep Empathy and Intimate Dialogue (Routledge, 2005).

Singing to the Lions: A Workshop Methodology to Help Children Overcome Fear and Violence in Their Lives

Monday 10.16.17

9am to 4pm

Pryzbyla Building Room 351

Singing to the Lions: A Workshop Methodology to Help Children Overcome Fear and Violence in Their Lives

Lucy Steinitz, MSW, PhD

6 CE Credits

 

REGISTRATION:

Regular registration: $120

Current NCSSS Field Instructor: $100

Current NCSSS Student: $40

 

 

Despite our knowledge of the effects that violence exposure has on child development, there are very few resources available to help children in low-resource settings respond effectively to fear and violence in their lives.  For this reason, in 2016 the presenter of this workshop collaborated with Zimbabwe-based child psychologist Dr. Jonathan Brakarsh under the auspices of Catholic Relief Services to develop Singing to the Lions, an experiential workshop for children and young adults that is based on principles of psycho-social resilience, cognitive psychology and narrative therapy. 

The premise of Singing to the Lions is that there are two ways we can react to fear and violence in our lives. One is to try to change the situation.  Even if we can't achieve complete success, there are still things we can do to make a positive difference and reduce the fear and violence.  We can reach out for help, strengthen our connections with friends and loved-ones, develop our problem-solving skills and take small steps to overcome our situation.  The other thing we can do is control the way we respond to our fear so that it doesn't overwhelm us. We can practice breathing techniques and other calming exercises.  We can feel better about who we are by realizing our talents, our skills and that we have already overcome past difficulties so we can do it again.   Singing to the Lions teaches us these skills by experiencing them through the workshop – and by having some good fun at the same time. 

 

Singing to the Lions uses art, games, dance, song, drama and discussion aimed to create knowledge, teach skills and strengthen resilience-building behaviors. Participants in this Professional Education course will be able to experience the same, thus developing first-hand knowledge about how the tool:

·         Helps participants identify personal strengths and build a positive identity, 

·         Facilitates understanding about the nature of fear and violence and how it can be prevented and overcome,

·         Teaches stress-reduction techniques that can assist with emotion regulation and coping,

·         Strengthens social and community supports within and beyond the group

·         Builds self-efficacy and empowerment by identifying and committing to actions that can result in a more positive future.

Participants will gain an in-depth understanding of this new tool and its application, both for international and in domestic settings.  Participants will learn:

·         How and why child-friendly group methodologies drawn from resource-poor settings overseas can also be used in the United States

·         How to implement fun activities that build personal strengths, self-efficacy and resilience to help children and youth overcome fear and violence in their lives.

·         How to implement this workshop curriculum in settings where they work or live.

·         How to help build the evidence of where and how this curriculum makes a positive difference in children’s lives.

Dr. Steinitz currently serves as Senior Technical Advisor for Protection (global) at Catholic Relief Services, which operates in over 100 countries. She concentrates on efforts to prevent and respond to the abuse and exploitation of children and vulnerable adults through local capacity-building, technical consultation, advocacy, systems-strengthening, and project development. She serves as the agency focal point for the development and dissemination of protection-related policies, procedures and supply-chain codes of conduct. Internationally, she has been concentrating on assisting Ebola-affected children in Sierra Leone, counter-trafficking issues in India, vulnerable children in Uganda and trauma-awareness and resilience for children affected by violence in Africa and elsewhere. 

Previously, Dr. Steinitz maintained the dual role of Pact’s Senior Technical Advisor and Deputy Chief of Party for USAID’s largest project for highly vulnerable children, based in Ethiopia (2011-2014).  Prior to Ethiopia, Dr. Steinitz was based in Namibia and worked as the African Region Technical Advisor for Children & Families (Family Health International, 2004-2010) and as Field Representative for the Stephen Lewis Foundation in Africa (part-time, 2004-2010). 

All of her earlier experience, both in Africa and the USA, was community-based.  She was Co-founder & National Coordinator of Catholic AIDS Action in Namibia (1998-2004); Co-Founder and Advisor of the Church Alliance for Orphans in Namibia (2001-2009); and – to round out her ecumenical base – Executive Director of Jewish Family Services in Baltimore, Md. (1982 – 1997). She has also held adjunct faculty positions in the USA (Bachelor’s and Master’s levels), worked closely with various African governments in consulting, research and various technical advisory roles, and authored and/or edited over 50 publications.  Consistently over the past 40 years, Dr. Steinitz has additionally remained actively engaged in many volunteer activities, mostly by providing capacity-development support to grass-roots organizations and to individuals in distress, and by serving as as mentor, sponsor and advisor to over 65 disadvantaged secondary and tertiary-level students in Ethiopia and Namibia.  

Leaving Home to Come Home: How Embracing the Unfamiliar Enhances Cultural Competence, Expands Self-Awareness & Enriches Clinical Effectiveness
Friday 10.20.17

9am to 4:30 pm (please note change in schedule, (6.5 CE credits)

Pryzbyla Building Room 351

Leaving Home to Come Home: How Embracing the Unfamiliar Enhances Cultural Competence, Expands Self-Awareness & Enriches Clinical Effectiveness

Marilee Aronson, Psy.D.

6.5 CE Credits (Cultural Competency)

 

REGISTRATION:

Regular registration: $120

Current NCSSS Field Instructor: $100

Current NCSSS Student: $40

 

Flooded by the noise and demands of everyday life, and attuned to that experience in her clients and students, Marilee Aronson embarked upon an Off the Grid adventure in September of 2012. Heeding a strong inner call, she left the very rewarding work of both her private practice as a clinical psychologist and her demanding graduate school faculty position.  She spent 10 months, primarily in Africa and India, seeking cultural immersion experiences to develop a more embodied understanding of other ways of being in our world.  In this workshop, Marilee will describe cultural themes spanning her time in Africa and India, and explore with participants how these themes relate to aspects of life in the United States. She will share highlights from her journey through image, sound, video and story. While this presentation parallels many themes in the diversity and worldview literature, it explores them in embodied and accessible ways -- since true cultural competence often comes more from an experience of the heart than of the mind. This presentation also describes the power of extended and immersive travel to hone ourselves as therapeutic instruments and to evolve personally, professionally and collectively.

This workshop will:

·         Highlight aspects of a personal Off the Grid experience—through images, sounds, stories and reflections—that reveal the impact of immersive travel on self-awareness, other-understanding and a sense of global interconnectedness.

·         Provide participants with an embodied understanding of cultural differences mirroring common themes in diversity-related psychology literature.

·         Foster a sense of connection with people who look and live differently.

·         Increase awareness of cultural values and assumptions underlying aspects of life in the US and insight into the relativity of cultural experience.

·         Demonstrate how genuine cultural understanding and attunement enhance our clinical work and create opportunities for more authentic living.

 

Participants will be able to:

·         Participants will explore the concept of conscious travel and identify at least 3 of its potential benefits.

·         Participants will be able to identify different cultural orientations to self, family, health, nature, elders, time and spirituality in several African communities.

·         Participants will be able to identify different cultural orientations to self, other, nature, elders, gender, schooling and spirituality in several Indian communities.

·         Participants will be able to compare and contrast cultural realities, values and assumptions in the US, Africa and India along at least 5 dimensions.

·         Participants will have the opportunity to discuss in small and large groups how these differences--and how our often ingrained cultural assumptions--impact our interactions and behaviors.

·         Participants will specifically examine how increased self-awareness and cultural understanding enhance empathic resonance and clinical effectiveness.

 

Trauma Informed Social Work Practice

Friday 11.3.17

9am to noon

Pryzbyla Building Room 351

Trauma Informed Social Work Practice

Denise Tordella, MA, LPC

3 CE Credits

 

REGISTRATION:

Regular registration: $60

Current NCSSS Field Instructor: $45

Current NCSSS Student: $25

 

A trauma-informed practice is the emerging standard of care for clinicians in therapeutic and social service practice settings.  Utilizing a trauma-informed lens provides clinicians with tools that support: an individualized approach to working with clients; a systemic approach to the practice of social work, therapy and counseling; and an awareness of the need for self-care for the clinician.

What do we mean when we say, “trauma-informed?”   Maxine Harris and Roger Fallot  (2001) state that trauma is viewed not as a single discrete event, but rather as a defining and organizing experience that forms the core of an individual’s identity. The explanations about abuse, the far-reaching impact, and the attempts to cope with the aftermath come to define who the trauma survivor is.  Trauma informed care focuses on what happened to the person and what adaptations did that person have to make as a result of what happened to them, rather than what is wrong with that person. 

This workshop will define trauma-informed practices to create a strengths-based approach to working with clients.

Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to:

·         Identify trauma informed practices

·         Define the components of trauma informed practices

·         Use ‘”people-first” language to promote healing and empowerment

·         Explore self-care strategies for the clinician to support the management of secondary trauma

 

Denise Tordella is a licensed professional counselor in Alexandria, Virginia, whose area of clinical specialization is integrated, trauma-informed, mental health and substance abuse treatment. She is a workshop presenter who provides training and consultation to universities, non-profit organizations and municipal mental health/substance abuse treatment service providers on the local and national level. She has taken post-graduate training that includes Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and Sensorimotor Psychotherapy. Her clinical focus includes incorporating mindfulness and body-oriented therapies to support individuals in managing the neurobiological effects of trauma, including emotional dysregulation and dissociation. Ms. Tordella is on the Board of Directors of Friends of Guest House, a non-profit organization that supports women making the transition from incarceration to re-entering the community. Ms. Tordella was selected by her peers as one of the Top 200 Therapists in Washington, DC, and can be reached via her website at www.denisetordella.com.

 

Engagement Strategies for Building Partnerships with Families Affected by Intergenerational Trauma

Friday 11.10.17

9am to 4pm

Pryzbyla Building Room 351

Engagement Strategies for Building Partnerships with Families Affected by Intergenerational Trauma

Sarah A. Gardner, LCSW-C

6 CE Credits

 

REGISTRATION:

Regular registration: $120

Current NCSSS Field Instructor: $100

Current NCSSS Student: $40

 

For individuals and families, high stress and multiple traumatic exposures across generations erode help seeking behavior and the belief in the possibility of improved conditions.  This workshop will deepen participants’ understanding of the importance of a strengths-based, shared power approach to engaging families affected by traumatic exposures.  A review of the literature will provide a framework for understanding the negative effects of traumatic exposures and the importance of specialized engagement strategies.  Clinical examples will be drawn from FamilyLive, a caregiver-focused clinical intervention developed in response to the needs of families exposed to significant adversities including racial and economic marginalization, community violence and traumatic histories. The model harnesses existing competencies and encourages caregivers to become active participants in the treatment process. Interactive exercises will offer participants the chance to reflect and expand on current practice strategies.  

Raise practitioner awareness about negative impact of traumatic experiences on help seeking behavior. Improve and expand practice strategies for engaging families in trauma services.

Participants will:

·         Recognize the negative effects of trauma exposures and various forms of social oppression on help seeking behavior.

·         Become familiar with a variety of specialized engagement strategies for use in child and family serving systems.

·         Reflect and expand on current practice strategies for forming and sustaining productive treatment alliances. 

From Prison to Home: The Psychological Challenges of Re-Entry

Friday 12.1.17

9am to noon

Pryzbyla Building Room 351

From Prison to Home: The Psychological Challenges of Re-Entry

Veronica Cruz, MSW, LICSW, LCSW-C

3 CE Credits

REGISTRATION:

Regular registration: $60

Current NCSSS Field Instructor: $45

Current NCSSS Student: $25

Offenders face an array of challenges when they attempt to transition from an institution back to their respective communities. The psychological challenges to successful re-entry are vast. This workshop will explore basic needs: stable housing, employment, and nourishment. While simultaneously exploring the key psychological challenges as they relate to substance abuse, mental health, social support and identity formation in order to counter obstacles in the re-entry process. This workshop will explore the benefits and challenges of re-entry.  Issues to be discussed include: re-entry programs, co-occurring disorders, implications for post-prison adjustment, support system, racial disparities, and re-entry. Current literature will be discussed and participants will be able to articulate psychological challenges of re-entry.  This is an interactive workshop with case scenarios presented and discussed.


Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:

·         Understand and explore the overall psychological and psychosocial challenges of re-entry.

·         Articulate the connection between psychological stability and social support in relationship to positive re-entry outcomes.  

·         Identify key challenges to re-entry and learn to devise and implement a successful re-entry plan.

·         Define various treatment techniques and modalities that are effective in working with this population.   

Veronica E. Cruz, has been in the social work profession for over seventeen years. Ms. Cruz was employed for ten years, at the Office of the Public Defender in Rockville as a forensic social worker. In 2015 she became the owner and CEO of Cruz and Associates a consulting firm specialized in forensic social work in particular sentencing mitigation for juvenile and adult offenders, professional continuing education and psychotherapy. Ms. Cruz has served as an adjunct faculty at the Catholic University of America School of Social Work and the University of Maryland teaching Ethics and Advanced trauma. She started her social work career as an emergency room and psychiatric social and credits that fast pace environment for preparing her in becoming a forensic social worker. She has extensive experience in inpatient psych treatment and partial hospitalization psych programs.  She is a graduate of the Catholic University of America with a B.A. in psychology, and received her Masters of Social Work, specializing in clinical mental health from the University Of Maryland School Of Social Work. In January 2014 she completed an Advanced Forensic Social Work Certification through the University of Maryland Continuing Education Department. Ms. Cruz specializes in criminal defense mitigation, dual diagnosis, crisis intervention, addiction, trauma and working with diverse ethnic groups. In 2008 she was the co-creator and co-chair of the National Association of Social Workers (Maryland Chapter): Forensic Social Work Committee. From 2011 to 2016 she was the chair of this committee.

 

Registration Information

Online registration is available through our website. Look for the workshop you are interested in, and link to the registration site. Current NCSSS students and current NCSSS Field Instructors receive a discounted rate.
Questions... Please call 202-319-4388 or email Allyson Shaffer (shaffera@cua.edu)
Cancellation policy 
Refunds will be honored up to 1 week prior to the workshop, minus a $25.00 processing fee.  Substitution requests for an alternate workshop will also be considered.  Please contact Allyson Shaffer at Shaffera@cua.edu Registrants will be notified if a workshop is cancelled due to low enrollment and registration fees will be fully refunded. Workshops will be cancelled if The Catholic University of America is closed due to inclement weather or other emergencies. Please check the website http://cua.edu for information on closures.
Parking
On campus parking is very limited. It is best to use public transportation. CUA is located on the Red Line of the Metro, CUA/Brookland stop.
Accommodations
If you require any special accommodations, we will try to meet those needs. Please call at least 2 weeks prior to an event to make reasonable requests.
For more information, contact
Allyson Shaffer, Associate Director, Office of Field Education and Professional Development. Tel: 202-319-4388,  Shaffera@cua.edu.